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Think Tanks in Australia : Policy Contributions and Influence / Trent Hagland.

By: Material type: TextTextSeries: Interest Groups, Advocacy and Democracy SeriesPublisher: Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2023Copyright date: ©2023Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (349 pages)Content type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9783031270444
Subject(s): Genre/Form: LOC classification:
  • JF1525.P6
Contents:
Intro -- Acknowledgements -- Praise for Think Tanks in Australia -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- 1 Think Tanks in Australia -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Think Tanks and Public Policy Influence -- 1.3 What We Know, and What We Do Not -- 1.4 Book Structure -- References -- 2 Understanding Think Tanks: A Global Endeavour -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Foundational International Literature -- 2.3 The Australian Literature -- 2.4 Core Concepts -- 2.4.1 Typologies -- 2.4.2 Theories -- The Elite Model -- The Pluralist Perspective -- Network Approaches -- References -- 3 Studying Australian Think Tanks -- 3.1 The Research Question -- 3.2 Influence Conceptualisations -- 3.3 Analytical Framework and Methodological Approach -- 3.3.1 Strand One: Document Analysis and Surveys -- Defining the Think Tank Population -- Survey Design -- 3.3.2 Strand Two: Semi-Structured Interviews -- 3.3.3 Strand Three: Case Study Analysis -- Case Study Structure -- Case Study Candidates -- Case Study Selection -- References -- 4 The State of the Industry -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Structural and Operational Diversity -- 4.2.1 Size and Focus -- 4.2.2 Independence -- 4.2.3 Geographical Distribution -- 4.2.4 Typologies -- 4.2.5 Ideological Persuasions -- 4.3 Financial Circumstances -- 4.3.1 Financial Context -- 4.3.2 Funding -- 4.4 Summary -- References -- 5 The Evolutionary Path and Comparative Perspectives -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Development Waves -- 5.2.1 Marsh and Stone's (2004) Wave Framework -- 5.2.2 An Alternative Wave Framework -- 5.3 Development Constraints -- 5.4 Comparative Development: An International Perspective -- 5.5 Summary -- References -- 6 Influence Intentions -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Think Tank Objectives -- 6.3 Think Tank Target Audiences -- 6.4 Policy Cycle Engagement -- 6.5 Summary -- References -- 7 Influence Methods -- 7.1 Introduction.
7.2 Idea Propagation -- 7.3 The Centrality of Research -- 7.4 Public Events and Seminars -- 7.5 Political Access -- 7.6 New Media -- 7.6.1 Social Media -- 7.6.2 Podcasts and Videos -- 7.7 Summary -- References -- 8 Influence Claims and Perceptions -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 The Importance of Perceptions -- 8.3 Influence Evaluations -- 8.4 Think Tank Claims -- 8.5 Journalist Perceptions -- 8.6 Parliamentarian Perceptions -- 8.7 Summary -- References -- 9 The Centre for Independent Studies: NSW Child Protection and Adoption Laws -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Centre for Independent Studies: Background -- 9.3 Child Protection and Adoption in Australia -- 9.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 9.3.2 Political Context -- Australia's Historical Experience -- NSW Reforms -- 9.3.3 Actor Power -- 9.3.4 Ideas -- The CIS Argument -- Initial Engagements -- Evolutionary Ideas -- Issue Framing -- Adherents -- A Networked Approach? -- 9.4 Conclusions -- References -- 10 Grattan Institute: School Funding Reforms -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Grattan Institute: Background -- 10.3 School Funding in Australia -- 10.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 10.3.2 Political Context -- The 'Gonski Review' -- 'Turnbull Co-opts Gonski' -- 10.3.3 Actor Power -- Government and Non-government Parties -- Non-government Organisations: The Anti-reformists -- Non-government Organisations: The Reformists -- Grattan Institute -- 10.3.4 Ideas -- Issue Framing -- 10.4 Conclusions -- References -- 11 Lowy Institute: Australia's Diplomatic Deficit -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Lowy Institute: Background -- 11.3 Australia's Overseas Representation -- 11.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 11.3.2 Political Context -- 11.3.3 Actor Power -- 11.3.4 Ideas -- The Lowy Argument -- Issue Framing -- 11.4 Conclusion -- References -- 12 Influence Processes and Manifestations -- 12.1 Introduction.
12.2 Divergent Styles, Methods, and Perceptions -- 12.3 Policy Capacity -- 12.4 Network and Policy Process Perspectives -- 12.5 Influence Manifestations -- References -- 13 Conclusions -- References -- Appendix A: Australia's Think Tank Population -- Centrist Think Tanks -- Right-leaning Think Tanks -- Left-leaning Think Tanks -- Appendix B: Interview Participants -- Think Tank Interviewees -- Journalist Interviewees -- Parliamentarian Interviewees -- Other Interviewees -- Chapter Nine (CIS) Interviewees -- Chapter Ten (Grattan) Interviewees -- Chapter Eleven (Lowy) Interviewees -- Appendix C: Government Grants -- Appendix D: 'Think-and-Do-Tanks' -- Centre for Policy Development -- Beyond Zero Emissions -- Appendix E: Revolving Doors -- Revolving? or Just Swinging? -- Appendix F: Think Tank Comparative Metrics -- Reference -- Index.
Summary: This book provides the most comprehensive study of the Australian think-tank industry to date. Drawing on empirical evidence, it first assesses the structure of the industry, the methods think tanks use to persuade policymakers, and public perceptions of their effectiveness. The book then proceeds to examine three unique policy cases to analyse think tank influence on policymaking. It argues that whilst think tanks play important roles in Australia's policy process, their impacts vary depending on their approach and objectives. The book also demonstrates that policymakers with contrasting ideological orientations diverge in their assessments of the utility and influence of think tanks. It will appeal to students and scholars of public policy, and practitioners in public administration and governance.
List(s) this item appears in: Electronic Books | الكتب الإلكترونية
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Item type Current library Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Online Resource Online Resource UAE Federation Library | مكتبة اتحاد الإمارات Online Copy | نسخة إلكترونية Link to resource Not for loan

Intro -- Acknowledgements -- Praise for Think Tanks in Australia -- Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- 1 Think Tanks in Australia -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Think Tanks and Public Policy Influence -- 1.3 What We Know, and What We Do Not -- 1.4 Book Structure -- References -- 2 Understanding Think Tanks: A Global Endeavour -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Foundational International Literature -- 2.3 The Australian Literature -- 2.4 Core Concepts -- 2.4.1 Typologies -- 2.4.2 Theories -- The Elite Model -- The Pluralist Perspective -- Network Approaches -- References -- 3 Studying Australian Think Tanks -- 3.1 The Research Question -- 3.2 Influence Conceptualisations -- 3.3 Analytical Framework and Methodological Approach -- 3.3.1 Strand One: Document Analysis and Surveys -- Defining the Think Tank Population -- Survey Design -- 3.3.2 Strand Two: Semi-Structured Interviews -- 3.3.3 Strand Three: Case Study Analysis -- Case Study Structure -- Case Study Candidates -- Case Study Selection -- References -- 4 The State of the Industry -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Structural and Operational Diversity -- 4.2.1 Size and Focus -- 4.2.2 Independence -- 4.2.3 Geographical Distribution -- 4.2.4 Typologies -- 4.2.5 Ideological Persuasions -- 4.3 Financial Circumstances -- 4.3.1 Financial Context -- 4.3.2 Funding -- 4.4 Summary -- References -- 5 The Evolutionary Path and Comparative Perspectives -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Development Waves -- 5.2.1 Marsh and Stone's (2004) Wave Framework -- 5.2.2 An Alternative Wave Framework -- 5.3 Development Constraints -- 5.4 Comparative Development: An International Perspective -- 5.5 Summary -- References -- 6 Influence Intentions -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Think Tank Objectives -- 6.3 Think Tank Target Audiences -- 6.4 Policy Cycle Engagement -- 6.5 Summary -- References -- 7 Influence Methods -- 7.1 Introduction.

7.2 Idea Propagation -- 7.3 The Centrality of Research -- 7.4 Public Events and Seminars -- 7.5 Political Access -- 7.6 New Media -- 7.6.1 Social Media -- 7.6.2 Podcasts and Videos -- 7.7 Summary -- References -- 8 Influence Claims and Perceptions -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 The Importance of Perceptions -- 8.3 Influence Evaluations -- 8.4 Think Tank Claims -- 8.5 Journalist Perceptions -- 8.6 Parliamentarian Perceptions -- 8.7 Summary -- References -- 9 The Centre for Independent Studies: NSW Child Protection and Adoption Laws -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Centre for Independent Studies: Background -- 9.3 Child Protection and Adoption in Australia -- 9.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 9.3.2 Political Context -- Australia's Historical Experience -- NSW Reforms -- 9.3.3 Actor Power -- 9.3.4 Ideas -- The CIS Argument -- Initial Engagements -- Evolutionary Ideas -- Issue Framing -- Adherents -- A Networked Approach? -- 9.4 Conclusions -- References -- 10 Grattan Institute: School Funding Reforms -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Grattan Institute: Background -- 10.3 School Funding in Australia -- 10.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 10.3.2 Political Context -- The 'Gonski Review' -- 'Turnbull Co-opts Gonski' -- 10.3.3 Actor Power -- Government and Non-government Parties -- Non-government Organisations: The Anti-reformists -- Non-government Organisations: The Reformists -- Grattan Institute -- 10.3.4 Ideas -- Issue Framing -- 10.4 Conclusions -- References -- 11 Lowy Institute: Australia's Diplomatic Deficit -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Lowy Institute: Background -- 11.3 Australia's Overseas Representation -- 11.3.1 Issue Characteristics -- 11.3.2 Political Context -- 11.3.3 Actor Power -- 11.3.4 Ideas -- The Lowy Argument -- Issue Framing -- 11.4 Conclusion -- References -- 12 Influence Processes and Manifestations -- 12.1 Introduction.

12.2 Divergent Styles, Methods, and Perceptions -- 12.3 Policy Capacity -- 12.4 Network and Policy Process Perspectives -- 12.5 Influence Manifestations -- References -- 13 Conclusions -- References -- Appendix A: Australia's Think Tank Population -- Centrist Think Tanks -- Right-leaning Think Tanks -- Left-leaning Think Tanks -- Appendix B: Interview Participants -- Think Tank Interviewees -- Journalist Interviewees -- Parliamentarian Interviewees -- Other Interviewees -- Chapter Nine (CIS) Interviewees -- Chapter Ten (Grattan) Interviewees -- Chapter Eleven (Lowy) Interviewees -- Appendix C: Government Grants -- Appendix D: 'Think-and-Do-Tanks' -- Centre for Policy Development -- Beyond Zero Emissions -- Appendix E: Revolving Doors -- Revolving? or Just Swinging? -- Appendix F: Think Tank Comparative Metrics -- Reference -- Index.

This book provides the most comprehensive study of the Australian think-tank industry to date. Drawing on empirical evidence, it first assesses the structure of the industry, the methods think tanks use to persuade policymakers, and public perceptions of their effectiveness. The book then proceeds to examine three unique policy cases to analyse think tank influence on policymaking. It argues that whilst think tanks play important roles in Australia's policy process, their impacts vary depending on their approach and objectives. The book also demonstrates that policymakers with contrasting ideological orientations diverge in their assessments of the utility and influence of think tanks. It will appeal to students and scholars of public policy, and practitioners in public administration and governance.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2023. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.

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